Relapse prevention for addictive behaviors PMC

For example, Bandura, who developed Social Cognitive Theory, posited that perceived choice is key to goal adherence, and that individuals may feel less motivation when goals are imposed by others (Bandura, 1986). Miller, whose seminal work on motivation and readiness for treatment led to multiple widely used measures of SUD treatment readiness and the development of Motivational Interviewing, also argued for the importance of goal choice in treatment (Miller, 1985). Drawing from Intrinsic Motivation Theory (Deci, 1975) and the controlled drinking literature, Miller (1985) argued abstinence violation effect that clients benefit most when offered choices, both for drinking goals and intervention approaches. A key point in Miller’s theory is that motivation for change is “action-specific”; he argues that no one is “unmotivated,” but that people are motivated to specific actions or goals (Miller, 2006). For example, in AUD treatment, individuals with both goal choices demonstrate significant improvements in drinking-related outcomes (e.g., lower percent drinking days, fewer heavy drinking days), alcohol-related problems, and psychosocial functioning (Dunn & Strain, 2013).

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abstinence violation effect

Because an increase in self-efficacy is closely tied to achieving preset goals, successful mastery of these individual smaller tasks is the best strategy to enhance feelings of self-mastery. The second strategy, which is possibly the most important aspect of RP, involves evaluating the client’s existing motivation and ability to cope with specific high-risk situations and then helping the client learn more effective coping skills. This article presents one influential model of the antecedents of relapse and the treatment measures that can be taken to prevent or limit relapse after treatment completion. This relapse prevention (RP) model, which was developed by Marlatt and Gordon (1985) and which has been widely used in recent years, has been the focus of considerable research. This article reviews various immediate and covert triggers of relapse proposed by the RP model, as well as numerous specific and general intervention strategies that may help patients avoid and cope with relapse-inducing situations. The article also presents studies that have provided support for the validity of the RP model.

Models of nonabstinence psychosocial treatment for SUD

However, they do not elucidate patterns of non-disordered use over time, nor the likelihood of maintaining drug use without developing a DUD. Another factor that may occur is the Problem of Immediate Gratification where the client settles for shorter positive outcomes and does not consider larger long term adverse consequences when they lapse. This can be worked on by creating a decisional matrix where the pros and cons of continuing the behaviour versus abstaining are written down within both shorter and longer time frames and the therapist helps the client to identify unrealistic outcome expectancies5. https://ecosoberhouse.com/ Relapse prevention initially evolved as a calculated response to the longer-term treatment failures of other therapies. The assumption of RP is that it is problematic to expect that the effects of a treatment that is designed to moderate or eliminate an undesirable behaviour will endure beyond the termination of that treatment. Further, there are reasons to presume a problem will re-emerge on returning to the old environment that elicited and maintained the problem behaviour; for instance, forgetting the skills, techniques, and information taught during therapy; and decreased motivation5.

Does a simple measurement for a complex problem work? – Psychology Today

Does a simple measurement for a complex problem work?.

Posted: Sun, 24 Dec 2017 08:00:00 GMT [source]

1. Review aims

Indeed, a prominent harm reduction psychotherapist and researcher, Rothschild, argues that the harm reduction approach represents a “third wave of addiction treatment” which follows, and is replacing, the moral and disease models (Rothschild, 2015a). Some researchers propose that the self-control required to maintain behavior change strains motivational resources, and that this “fatigue” can undermine subsequent self-control efforts [78]. Consistent with this idea, EMA studies have shown that social drinkers report greater alcohol consumption and violations of self-imposed drinking limits on days when self-control demands are high [79].

abstinence violation effect

Not surprisingly, molecular genetic approaches have increasingly been incorporated in treatment outcome studies, allowing novel opportunities to study biological influences on relapse. Given the rapid growth in this area, we allocate a portion of this review to discussing initial evidence for genetic associations with relapse. Specifically, we focus on recent, representative findings from studies evaluating candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) as moderators of response to substance use interventions.

Specific Intervention Strategies